Tony Romo Wants To Convey A Specific Message During First Super Bowl As CBS Analyst

During his first Super Bowl in the broadcast booth, Tony Romo hopes to communicate the scale of the occasion to viewers.

During his first Super Bowl in the broadcast booth, Tony Romo hopes to communicate the scale of the occasion to viewers.

NEW YORK — Don’t expect a different Tony Romo on Super Bowl Sunday. An excitable “football nerd” with a knack for clairvoyance, the same Romo viewers have largely enjoyed over two seasons at CBS will call Super Bowl LIII, his first, on Feb. 3.

“We’ve been talking about it for two years,” CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus said. “I’ve tried to emphasize for them that this is just another football game. Listen, there’s a lot more hype. There are a lot more viewers. But it’s still a football game.”

If Romo has mellowed out at all during his sophomore season working with Jim Nantz, it hasn’t been by edict. “You’ll see stuff on social media like, ‘Tony is not as excited as he used to be,’ or ‘CBS has pulled him back,’” lead producer Jim Rikhoff said. “It’s never that. We never do that. It’s basically, we let him go.” And that plan will be the same as millions of fans get their first taste of the former Cowboys QB as a game analyst.